Search found 585 matches

by Palores
Thu Jul 08, 2010 9:25 am
Forum: Cornwall24 Discussion Board
Topic: Anti-Cornish gerrymandering
Replies: 71
Views: 4485

Re: Anti-Cornish gerrymandering

Any mileage in an appeal to Europe?
by Palores
Wed Jul 07, 2010 3:52 pm
Forum: Cornwall24 Discussion Board
Topic: Anti-Cornish gerrymandering
Replies: 71
Views: 4485

Anti-Cornish gerrymandering

Have you seen latest Government proposals ? Plans to be drawn up by the Boundary Commission to make a new constituency which could include areas of South East Cornwall being combined with Plymouth or West Devon. See "thisisplymouth" today`s headlines!
by Palores
Sun Jul 04, 2010 3:30 pm
Forum: Cornwall24 Discussion Board
Topic: Who owns the foreshore around Looe Island?
Replies: 47
Views: 2730

Re: Who owns the foreshore around Looe Island?

Back to my original topic ..... The Cornwall Naturalists Trust state on their website: "Unusually, the island's foreshore is not owned by the Crown but is private property. Apparently in 1873 the then Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) sold the rights to settle a gambling debt!" This is interesting ...
by Palores
Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:15 am
Forum: Cornwall24 Discussion Board
Topic: Who owns the foreshore around Looe Island?
Replies: 47
Views: 2730

Re: Who owns the foreshore around Looe Island?

Sorry that the link did not work. The fuller URL is:

http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/foru ... 3&p=425648

Failing that, put "Ranneys Looe" into Google and go to the item marked "Guidebook Community Pages".
by Palores
Tue Jun 29, 2010 2:00 pm
Forum: Cornwall24 Discussion Board
Topic: Who owns the foreshore around Looe Island?
Replies: 47
Views: 2730

Who owns the foreshore around Looe Island?

By chance I came across an interesting discussion about kayakers trying to land on the foreshore of Looe Island, and being told to "push off". No reference to the famous 19th century foreshore case, however; some contributors thought that the foreshore around the island belonged to the Crown! Here i...
by Palores
Thu Jun 17, 2010 3:02 pm
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek
Replies: 309
Views: 11438

Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

an venyn, mar pleg!
by Palores
Thu Jun 17, 2010 2:59 pm
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Cymreictod
Replies: 117
Views: 5501

Re: Cymreictod

I have already pointed out that both gallosek and galosek occur in earlier texts. Here the <ll> or <l> represents an unstressed sound, so [ll] is reduced to [l]. The scribes were evidently uncertain whether to use a morphophonemic spelling gallosek , knowing that gallos had [ll] or to use a phoneti...
by Palores
Thu Jun 17, 2010 9:13 am
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Cymreictod
Replies: 117
Views: 5501

Re: Cymreictod

By "stressed /l/" is meant /l/ between two vowels, the first of which is stressed. By "stressed /ll/ is meant /ll/ between two vowels, the first of which is stressed. I find it remarkable that in the list of words from SA which I posted earlier, words with stressed /l/ were spelled <l>, and words wi...
by Palores
Mon Jun 14, 2010 3:20 pm
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Cymreictod
Replies: 117
Views: 5501

Re: Cymreictod

ll and l alike are [l] In English, maybe, but not in the Cornish piece Sacrament of the Altar (dated 1576). I have been supplied with the following examples. With stressed /ll/ dallath x1 gallus x6 illen 'we can' illans 'they can' halla x3 'might be able' whrella 'might do' pelha x3 tillar x2, tell...
by Palores
Sun Jun 13, 2010 9:15 pm
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Cymreictod
Replies: 117
Views: 5501

Re: Cymreictod

Indeed I was. I would spell Keigwin's word as ollgalloester.
by Palores
Sun Jun 13, 2010 3:42 pm
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Cymreictod
Replies: 117
Views: 5501

Re: Cymreictod

Williams' -uster is a Bretonism. The only historical example which resembles this is Lhuyd's eyrysder, probably made up by him.
by Palores
Fri Jun 11, 2010 8:10 am
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Research on historical Cornish
Replies: 86
Views: 3713

Re: Research on historical Cornish

marhak wrote:
Minalto is 'men', (stone) + OC '*altou'
Is it, though? Any historical forms? One would have expected Old Cornish *altyou.
by Palores
Fri Jun 11, 2010 8:04 am
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: wrussa
Replies: 36
Views: 2360

Re: wrussa

However I still have some confusion, some references give "a wrussa" as "had" without the "re", is this because of a difference between the orthographies? No, it is not an orthographical difference; it may be because historically, the form with re was found only in the Passion Poem. In Handbook of ...
by Palores
Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:51 pm
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: wrussa
Replies: 36
Views: 2360

Re: wrussa

How do you say would have something? Like, "if it were more clearly marked, I would have found it"? Is it "my a wrussa y gavoes"? Yes, it is. "I had found it". is it also "My a wrussa y gavoes"? No, it is my re wrussa y gavoes . How do you distinguish between the two? The first uses the particle a ...
by Palores
Mon May 31, 2010 3:46 pm
Forum: Cornish Language, Culture and History
Topic: Edinburgh
Replies: 21
Views: 940

CJenkin said:

ow marghogeth seems fine for riding a horse but what about riding a trike?




teyrrosa 'to ride a tricycle';  teyrrosya 'go on a tricycle tour'