The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

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KernowBysVyken
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The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by KernowBysVyken » Fri Mar 04, 2011 5:34 pm

So what is 'Cultural Genocide'?


Article 7 of a 1994 draft of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples uses the phrase "cultural genocide" but does not define what it means. The complete article reads as follows:
Indigenous peoples have the collective and individual right not to be subjected to ethnocide and cultural genocide, including prevention of and redress for:

(a) Any action which has the aim or effect of depriving them of their integrity as distinct peoples, or of their cultural values or ethnic identities;

(b) Any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing them of their lands, territories or resources;

(c) Any form of population transfer which has the aim or effect of violating or undermining any of their rights;

(d) Any form of assimilation or integration by other cultures or ways of life imposed on them by legislative, administrative or other measures;

(e) Any form of propaganda directed against them.



A) Any action which has the aim or effect of depriving them of their integrity as distinct peoples, or of their cultural values or ethnic identities.


The English School Curriculum does not allow Cornish history to be taught in Schools.

From Professor Philip Payton:

The idea of a Roman Britain that gives way to an Anglo-Saxon England, a view of early history that leaves little room for consideration of indigenous continuity (not least in Cornwall, encourages the erroneous equation of Britain with England, and reduces British (and thus Cornish) experience to a succession of invasions – Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Normans.

This is the approach of the so-called National Curriculum, the staple diet of schoolchildren in Cornwall as much as it is in Sussex or Hampshire, one that leaves pupils in many Cornish schools with little idea of the reality and issues of early Cornish history. We can only agree with Professor Charles Thomas when he expresses ‘sorrow and annoyance….at the undue extension of words like England, English or a philosophy of a taught British past underlying such book –titles as Everyday Life in Roman and Anglo-Saxon Times, Roman Britain and the English Settlements, or Roman Britain to Saxon England. There are still others of us, west of Offa’s Dyke and the river Tamar, and north of Hadrian’s Wall.

Mark Stoyle:

The objectives of KernowSceptics ( as he calls them) will always be to 'push Cornish history back into the box labelled English local history and nail down the lid'.

Not quite right is he?

As far the English School Curriculum is concerned, Cornish history has NEVER been out of the box. Indeed, so effective has been the forced assimilation of the Cornish, that even those who call themselves Cornish are ignorant of their own history!


B) Any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing them of their lands, territories or resources;

Well we've all seen the State quango that is 'English Heritage' stamped over Cornwall. Yet again, visual evidence of the English imposing their identity upon the Cornish. And some of the Cornish don't even realise

John Angarrack:

English Heritage: Multi-million pound anti-Cornish propaganda machine. Since when has the likes of Chysauster, Tintagel Castle and Kind Donierts Stone been the heritage of the English? The English have only been here five minutes so they feel the need to commandeer public funds to backdate their longevity in this island. And surely laying claim to Stonehenge is taking things a bit far.


C) Any form of population transfer which has the aim or effect of violating or undermining any of their rights.

English air-brushing Cornish history out of existence.


D) Any form of assimilation or integration by other cultures or ways of life imposed on them by legislative, administrative or other measures.


No accommodation in the English Schools Curriculum for Cornish Language lessons in Cornish schools.

E) Any form of propaganda directed against them.

Refer to English Heritage and the E.S.C.



The fact that the English deny the Cornish their unique history to be taught in Cornish schools IS cultural genocide.

Cornwall 2000 and individuals have campaigned to have Cornish identity recognised within the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. The European Commission recommended Cornish recognition under the FCPNM.

The Advisory Committee noted that London had not adopted the representations made by Cornish organisations and individuals concerning the inclusion of the Cornish under the FCPNM. The Committee advised that their Celtic identity, and specific history, language and culture of the Cornish, has culminated most recently in an application for judicial review concerning London's non-inclusion of the Cornish is the State Report.

The cultural genocide of the Cornish continues, and the English are in denial.

Cormorant
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by Cormorant » Fri Mar 04, 2011 5:42 pm

Speaking on behalf of the United Kingdom government, UK Ambassador and Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Karen Pierce, "emphasized that the Declaration was non-legally binding and did not propose to have any retroactive application on historical episodes. National minority groups and other ethnic groups within the territory of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories did not fall within the scope of the indigenous peoples to which the Declaration applied."[

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Marhak
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by Marhak » Fri Mar 04, 2011 5:46 pm

It's irrelevant whether it's legally binding, and irrelevant whether London consider inclusion of monirities within Britain. It's certainly morally binding and any right-minded person would consider it so. Sadly we're not dealing with that sort of person. And I draw your attention to the definitions of genocide in that Declaration.

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TGG
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by TGG » Fri Mar 04, 2011 8:40 pm


Definitely a topic that should be investigated further here . An interesting document!

TGGFor The (Real)Reason Why!
STOP THE CORNISH GENOCIDE! -
They declare their Cornishness with pride
Whilst oblivious to our genocide
That England imposes
With smiles and Red Roses
Where the innocents, so gullibly, reside.


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Marhak
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by Marhak » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:31 pm

And where on that bloody great list are we supposed to look, Shaggy? Cite a date so we can find it.

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TGG
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by TGG » Sat Mar 05, 2011 2:13 am


Marhak, the proper link is here but an interesting read in the following paragraphs here. In the UN site it is about 2/3 down the page. Just do a find for 'Karen'.

TGGFor The (Real)Reason Why!
STOP THE CORNISH GENOCIDE! -
They declare their Cornishness with pride
Whilst oblivious to our genocide
That England imposes
With smiles and Red Roses
Where the innocents, so gullibly, reside.


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Marhak
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by Marhak » Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:24 am

Aha, so that's HER take on it (or that of her paymasters). I should have known that was the case if Shaggy had cited it. I wonder what spin they put on the term "indigenous" to Britain. A pound to a pinch of sh*t that they include their own - our second wave of illegal immigrants: The English.

t2
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by t2 » Sat Mar 05, 2011 10:02 am

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Last edited by t2 on Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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TeamKernow
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by TeamKernow » Sat Mar 05, 2011 10:08 am

How about

'21st Century English Cultural Genocide & Ethnic Cleansing In The Celtic Nation & Duchy Of Cornwall'

A fine title for an Anglo-Imperialist Exeter University CUC Annexe in The Duchy student dissertation and/or PhD...

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TGG
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by TGG » Sat Mar 05, 2011 6:53 pm


by t2 » Sat Mar 05, 2011 10:02 am

r we now calling it 'Cornish Cultural Genocide'
As I have previously pointed out 'genocide' is 'genocide' namely 'job to do' or 'job done'. The attachment of 'cultural'' or 'physical' distinguishes the particular technique/method being applied. You have obviously never felt the need to query the usual absence of 'physical'. There are a number of techniques that can be used and it is, typically, usually more than one.

If we look to the past century, then 'education' is one that can be construed as removing children from the target group' as from this extract :
Extract:
Cultural genocide ultimately was excluded from the final Convention, except for a limited prohibition on the forcible transfer of a group’s children. The drafters acknowledged that the removal of children was physically and biologically destructive but further recognized that indoctrinating children into the customs,language, and values of a foreign group was “tantamount to the destruction of the [child’s] group, whose future depended on that next generation.”
This would slot into the 'physical' category, although it could equally be construed as being in some of the others. Using the qualifier 'cultural' is fine, but it certainly is not the whole story. Lemkin's identified "Techniques" were: "Political", "Social", "Cultural", "Economic", "Biological", "Physical", "Religious", and "Moral".

Each case has its own markers and I would certainly add "Territory" or "Geography" to the list for our Cornish Duchy, because a key factor in genocide, however one needs to define it, is to "destroy the person's relationship to their territory". This is an over-arching 'cultural' issue, because that is what culture really means, but not generally understood as such. The People-Territory Relationship was a term introduced to me by Richard Griggs, when we met, in 1994 (I think?), whilst he was researching the '100 European Nations' for the National Geographic magazine.

It is Territory, and People, that should be the principal focus of any action that we indulge ourselves in, because we cannot afford the luxury of failing in either. The things that bring these together is culture and constitution and all that emanates from them. Our politicians are blind to these truths.

TGGFor The (Real)Reason Why![/size]

edited to add extract, with link 5th March - 20:16
edited to add final paragraph 5th March - 23:57
STOP THE CORNISH GENOCIDE! -
They declare their Cornishness with pride
Whilst oblivious to our genocide
That England imposes
With smiles and Red Roses
Where the innocents, so gullibly, reside.


t2
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by t2 » Sun Mar 06, 2011 3:55 am

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Last edited by t2 on Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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TGG
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by TGG » Sun Mar 06, 2011 12:22 pm


"Raphael Lemkin's idea" is a particularly insulting way to refer to someone's lifetime dedication to the subject and who brought it to the world's attention to be enshrined in international law.

"When was Cornish last taught in Schools here in Cornwall? - It has never been a part of the formal education system, to my knowledge, although it has been taught, to some degree, by some, because of their own awareness of its importance. Despite the point that you are seeking to make, its omission is, and continues to be, a part of the general theme of genocide.

"When was the first time English was taught in Schools here in Cornwall instead of Cornish?" - Since 'English' is the official language of the multinational State, your question is irrelevant.

"When was the teaching of Cornish banned in Schools here in Cornwall?" - Despite the point that you are seeking to make, its omission is, and continues to be, a part of the general theme of genocide, because its existence, for example, placenames, should be an integral part of any curriculum, which would directly raise awareness, and interest, in the language, territory and history. This knowledge would have helped to consolidate the Cornish Identity and invite the respect that is hitherto absent, because of the process of genocide.

TGGFor The (Real)Reason Why!


edited to add final sentence 6th March - 12:00
STOP THE CORNISH GENOCIDE! -
They declare their Cornishness with pride
Whilst oblivious to our genocide
That England imposes
With smiles and Red Roses
Where the innocents, so gullibly, reside.


t2
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Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 8:55 pm

Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by t2 » Sun Mar 06, 2011 1:45 pm

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Last edited by t2 on Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Marhak
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by Marhak » Sun Mar 06, 2011 5:58 pm

Perhaps you should have asked: When was Cornish finally allowed to be taught in schools? Then, calculate the number of years since the foundation of the national education system, and we'll have that subject back in context.

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TGG
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Re: The English - Exponents of Cultural Genocide

Post by TGG » Sun Mar 06, 2011 9:09 pm


by t2 » Sun Mar 06, 2011 1:45 pm
"Raphael Lemkin's idea" is a particularly insulting
I meant this to mean your idea or take on Raphael Lemkin's work,
Whatever you meant, it is not what you said. However, my hypothesis regarding Cornish Genocide was developed a good 20 years before I even knew that Lemkin’s work existed. When I acquired a computer and did research on the subject, the existence of Lemkin’s definition simply reinforced, for me, the accuracy of my hypothesis.
We know it was a hard life here for many children in Cornwall. I read in 1867 those employed in agriculture would work from 6.30 in the morning till 8 or 9 at night few ever had the chance to go to school, it was not until the Elementary Education Act 1870 that things changed for good.
The Act that you refer to was a very hit & miss affair and we have yet to discover how it was introduced into Cornwall. Its purpose was to elevate the ‘British’ intellectual level at a time when The Empire was the only thing that mattered. Some resisted it, because it meant educating the poor cheap source of labour. The only requirement, as far as I can tell was the ability to read and write English plus ‘rithmatic. Namely, there were no apparent disciplines, which might have helped the students to think about identity, other than that of Empire within an environment where the synonymy of British=English was at its height. The following is a quote from a Dame School in 1840, which is unlikely to be matched by anything following the State imposed system:
”The next lesson was in geography. This subject was regarded by Peggy as her masterpiece of learning. "Es Coornwall a naation, a hiland, or what es 'a?" she inquired on one of these occasions. This question completely baffled the whole school, putting the scholars into one continued hubbub. "Ef I aint got a hanser in five menutes, I'll give 'ee all the custis" (caning on the hands), Peggy exclaimed. "I will have horder, though the owld school do cost more in canes than 'tes worth. Now what es Coornwall, I say. Es 'a a naation, a hiland or a furrin country?" "Boy Kit" was the first to hold up his hand. "Please, he hedn't no naation, he hedn't no hiland, nor he hedn't no furrin country, but he's cigged (stuck) on to a furrin country from the top hand," came the bright reply, which was heard with approval by the whole school, Peggy herself included.”
That is a particularly loaded quote, which could inspire a book, or play, for today's children.
But back to this genocide:

But this is one problem when you are indicating a belief that a Cornish Genocide has happen you are accusing someone of guilt and culpability of removing or destroying something, Teaching Cornish never happened in the formal education system and I doubt in any other education system here in Cornwall. It was never banned or prevented from being taught, so saying it is part of the Cornish Genocide is a bit strong as it couldn't be removed in the first place, so how could it be deliberately axed from schools?
Well spotted! Culpability! Definitely a case of, 'if the cap fits? Wear it! That is precisely what I am doing and it is not a problem! Since you wish to concentrate on the Cornish language, I have to say that I have never stated, or implied, that it had been ‘banned’, or ‘axed’. I am saying that its ‘absence’, or the ‘failure’ to include, for example, ‘place names’ (its omission!) has had a negative effect upon Cornish knowledge and rights. This has to be seen within the context of what was happening linguistically and constitutionally during the 19th century and before. There was considerable antiquarian interest in the language and a definite desire to distance the Duchy of Cornwall from Cornwall, because of attempts, by Westminster, to restrict the power of the Crown further.
I wouldn't have a problem with Cornish history being taught here in Cornwall, but telling people there was a Genocide in my view is wrong. I have other examples where I find this Genocide a problem, I am not against the rights and history of the Cornish but lets not accuse people of actively removing something you have only wished for in recent in times.
I am not telling people that there ‘was’ genocide’. I am stating categorically that there is, and has been, a process of genocide over many centuries. It will continue until such time as those responsible own up to that fact. The wherewithal to analyse and quantify the problem, as a consequence of seeking to explain the Cornish Paradox is, something that has been the focus of my adult life, coinciding, as it does, with the means to research it easily. However much you may wish to explain it away, the search for the truth will continue irrespective of where it takes us. Since you are currently focussing on education, what is your theory as to why there is no ‘Cornish-based’ subject matter in our schools? All actions, by whoever and wherever, that denies this represents some degree of culpability. But, only if the concept is made public.

BTW, there is another key element that needs to be tested.

TGGFor The (Real)Reason Why![/size]
STOP THE CORNISH GENOCIDE! -
They declare their Cornishness with pride
Whilst oblivious to our genocide
That England imposes
With smiles and Red Roses
Where the innocents, so gullibly, reside.


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