Cornwall in space

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carrek
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by carrek » Fri Apr 01, 2011 6:16 pm

TeamKernow wrote:
carrek wrote:Oh, TK, if it was down to people like you we'd all still be living in caves!
A typical youtubestyley moronic riposte there, carrek - not up to your usual higher standards.
:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) ;)
Doesn't mean I'm not right ;)

Who's to say the technology developed for spaceflight won't go some way towards solving the world's problems? We won't know until we try....

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Marhak
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by Marhak » Fri Apr 01, 2011 6:22 pm

Gentlemen - if there's one thing I can't stand, it's being told what to do. Please don't.

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TeamKernow
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by TeamKernow » Fri Apr 01, 2011 6:47 pm

carrek wrote:Who's to say the technology developed for spaceflight won't go some way towards solving the world's problems? We won't know until we try....
The chances of solving the world's human agency induced urgent problems are improved if we focus on that rather than wistfully wishing for some spin off from unrelated activity.
You're obviously enjoying your non-stick frying pan, carrek!
;)
Last edited by TeamKernow on Fri Apr 01, 2011 11:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Marhak
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by Marhak » Fri Apr 01, 2011 6:54 pm

Phooey! We'd have done this years ago if NASA had let us. We planned a manned mission to the sun but bleddy know-alls NASA said: "You can't - you'll burn up". We said: "We can - we're going at night". We wuz buggered anyway. Couldn't find a bottle big enough to take the stick.

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Marhak
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by Marhak » Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:01 pm

Cornwall's always been at the forefront of technology. Powered flight, blood transfusions, cars and locomotives - we led it all. Here's the real clincher.

In America, excavations found copper wire 20 feet down, provong that the USA had advanced communications systems 50 years earlier than anyone had thought.

Until Ross McPhee, in Scotland, went down 40 feet, also found remains of copper wire, and proved that Scotland had the same 100 years earlier than that.

Last year, Tristan Penbollock went down 200 feet outside St Just and found absolutely bugger-all. Proving that Cornwall went wireless 3,000 years ago.

carrek
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by carrek » Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:10 pm

TeamKernow wrote:
carrek wrote:Who's to say the technology developed for spaceflight won't go some way towards solving the world's problems? We won't know until we try....
The chances of solving the world's human agency induced urgent problems are improved if we focus on that rather than wistfully wishing for some spin off from unrelated activity.
You're obviously enjoying your non-stick frying pan, carreck!
;)
Penicillin was discovered entirely by accident, TK! And the space program has given us a panoply of health monitors, warning systems, respirators, remote microphones and other miniaturised medical technology.....

Some people care about the world's problems and are doing something about it. Other people do care, but not enough to do something. Isn't it better that they spend their time doing something that might indirectly go some way towards solving the problems rather than nothing at all?

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TeamKernow
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by TeamKernow » Fri Apr 01, 2011 8:42 pm

:idea: THIS :idea: seems reasonable:

'In 2010, according to the World Hunger Organization, 925 million of our fellow human beings went hungry. Meanwhile, untold millions (billions?) of US dollars are being spent to develop the Virgin Galactic Spaceship, of which the BBC has been given an exclusive first glance.

What good is the Virgin Galactic Spaceship to humanity? Will it improve the situation for the thousands of Japanese who are suffering from what is being dubbed the worst natural disaster in human history? Will it stem the violence in Afghanistan, Iraq, or Syria? No. The Virgin Galactic Spaceship is designed to give those people who have benefited from an unethical economic system that perpetually condemns millions of people to hunger a $200,000 joy ride.

Some people trek miles a day to get a bucket of reasonably clean water because the best resources have been diverted to the rich, while others (Egypt and Jordan come to mind) scrounge just to get decent tomatoes.

Yet we’re comfortable investing a huge pile of money so that 400 lucky? people can see the curvature of the earth? So
they can float?

The Virgin Galactic Spaceship represents the best and worst of humanity: sure, it demonstrates our technological might. In a couple of years, it will be possible to hurl six people at a time past the earth’s atmosphere at 2500 miles per hour. That’s really incredible. And it sounds like really good fun.

But it also demonstrates our unfailing arrogance, the same kind of arrogance that built a nuclear power station in a seismic zone despite knowing the horrific effects leaked radiation has on the hapless people in its path.

Like gold cars and ecologically destructive artificial islands, the Virgin Galactic Spaceship is an ostentatious display of our potential. And though the company told the BBC it will require less emissions per person than a trip across the Atlantic, we’re eating up valuable and dwindling resources so rich people can get their next adrenalin fix.

My parents often said “life isn’t fair.” Is that really the best that we can do? Can we really justify with no disruption to our collective conscience, at this time of economic and environmental uncertainty, such a frivolous waste of money and natural resources?

If we want a better world, or any kind of world, come to think of it, why not use that extra $200,000 floating around to invest in educating those whose natural resources and wealth have been usurped by rich nations. Invest in trees. Clean water. Agriculture. Medicine. Decent nutrition.

Why not show the better side of our collective selves? Our compassion, our sense of justice, and our ability to embrace moderation during lean times.

Virgin wants to send thousands of people into space at $200,000 a head. What a world of good we could do if that money were better spent.'

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Marhak
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by Marhak » Fri Apr 01, 2011 8:54 pm

A long time ago, I used to dream of the first manned flights to Mars. Older, wiser and a sight more cynical, I now hope it never happens. Look what humankind has done to this world, then ask what that poor planet has ever done to deserve the same? (H.G. Wells fans - keep out of this!)

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TeamKernow
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by TeamKernow » Fri Apr 01, 2011 9:21 pm

Marhak wrote:(H.G. Wells fans - keep out of this!)

Oooops!
Last edited by TeamKernow on Fri Apr 01, 2011 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Marhak
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by Marhak » Fri Apr 01, 2011 9:47 pm

OK - I'll allow it, TK - worth it for Justin Hayward's voice at 6:16 to end (although the whole thing is superb).

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TeamKernow
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by TeamKernow » Sat Apr 02, 2011 1:43 am

Marhak wrote:A long time ago, I used to dream of the first manned flights to Mars.
The Mad American Neo-Cons actually still do. They have the deranged idea that, once they've wasted this planet, a privileged élite few will scoot off to Mars, live in an artificial environment and gradually transform the atmosphere and land on Mars to something approximating to what we already have here on Earth or even have had that done already by some doomed sacrificial serfs. Dreamily in denial that human evolution and capabilities have been very finely tuned over millennia to Earth conditions and determinants. More than a bit of an extreme waste of time and effort displaying complete and utter disregard for Earthly humanity and the equitable distribution of Earth's finite resources. And taking the Columbus 'pioneer spirit' analogy more than a little too far and beyond the realms of contextual compatibility...
Far better to pay regard to and exercise proper care and stewardship over what we inhabit and have evolved to successfully inhabit already.
In any case, it's far more efficient, less resource intensive, less infrastructure dependent and more logical, Dr Spock, to explore space using micro and nano technologies rather than bulky, high support system dependency, high maintenance and psychologically complex and far from predictable human bodies and minds.

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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by ThingsThatGoFlirInTheShla » Sat Apr 02, 2011 9:36 am

TK, Take your computer, your house and all your luxuries and donate them to the poor.
Allow yourself only the basic amenities and flagellate every time you think of something other than the terrible situations of those less fortunate than us.
Yes it's awful but as we all donate to and care about the wellfare of these communities life does go on! As Bill Hicks rightly points out; if all governments spent the money allocated for war on clothing and feeding the poor then we could all explore space together. The future of these space planes will be transport. St Mawgan to Auckland in 3 hours - Nice!

Also, where's the harm in terraforming Mars? As far as we know nothing lives there any longer and an ease of population on this planet would only be a blessing.

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Marhak
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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by Marhak » Sat Apr 02, 2011 9:55 am

Space has done nothing to deserve the scourge of humankind. I also think that desert environments like Mars should be protected and preserved.

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Re: Cornwall in space

Post by ThingsThatGoFlirInTheShla » Sat Apr 02, 2011 10:08 am

Preserved? For what? Surely a dead, baron planet would be far better suited to a lush, useful outpost for at least evolutionary/biological research even if not for communities to live on. Why worship and preserve something of no use whatsoever? It's hardly a shrine.

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