Are the Cornish Basques?

Looking for your Cornish roots, long lost friends/family or just other people with the same family name then try here.
Gerens
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2006 11:51 am

Post by Gerens » Tue Dec 19, 2006 5:55 pm

I think re-evaluating history can change the future - academia generally plays down the achievements of ancient britons, portraying them as illiterate barbarians. The surviving cultures from these peoples therefore are therefore less civilised, unable to rule themselves, in comparison to the noble anglo-saxons. And now, the poeple of these surviving cultures tend to beilive this version of history, and lack any self beilief that they can govern themselves.

Rythsys-Omdowlor
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 5:09 pm

Post by Rythsys-Omdowlor » Tue Dec 19, 2006 10:17 pm

I doubt very much that we are more genetically akin to the Euskal, as they are correctly called, than the welsh, or any other British group. Perhaps we were 4000 years ago +, nevertheless we are obviously not genetically similar now, nor are they or anybody.
Europe is a melting pot, it is the cultural continuation that is important I would argue. Time has taken its toll and today's Cornish are completely different.

Pfishwick
Posts: 265
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2005 12:01 pm

Post by Pfishwick » Wed Dec 20, 2006 12:55 am


I think re-evaluating history can change the future - academia generally plays down the achievements of ancient britons, portraying them as illiterate barbarians. The surviving cultures from these peoples therefore are therefore less civilised, unable to rule themselves, in comparison to the noble anglo-saxons. And now, the poeple of these surviving cultures tend to beilive this version of history, and lack any self beilief that they can govern themselves.



Noswaith dda, Gerens! Sut mae, noswaith yma?

I fully agree that the re-evaluation of history is sorely needed with regards to Britain. Academia is already getting there, but the National Curriculum still likes to teach the 19th century version. :? Rest assured that more than a few folk throughout the UK fully respect these "surviving cultures"

Nos da,

Patrick

Ludgvan
Posts: 103
Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:36 am

Post by Ludgvan » Mon Jan 19, 2009 11:14 pm

Tommy Veale - you mention the submerged land, which shows how the sea level has changed. What is really concerning, is that the rise in the sea level around St Michael's Mount is measurably different today, compared to a few years back. There's an old poem about the Mount which goes something like 'Both land and island twice a day' but now the forecast is that St Michael's Mount will permanently be an island before the end of the century.

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