Cornish Giants

Looking for your Cornish roots, long lost friends/family or just other people with the same family name then try here.
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Allister
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Post by Allister » Wed Jul 18, 2007 3:00 pm

Carrying on from the "ancient kings of Cornwall" thread., I was wondering if anyone info on the time period the ancient Cornish giant mythologies were supposed to have occurred?

I assume, like myself, many Cornish were raised with these tales.

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Coady
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Post by Coady » Wed Jul 18, 2007 10:33 pm

I'm 52, and I was not raised with Giant legends.. mind you, most of my family are well over 6' tall........
We live in interesting times!

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Allister
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Post by Allister » Wed Jul 18, 2007 11:19 pm

Really. I was raised in the Roche-Bodmin area and was told the stories of the giants that once lived in the area.

Joaniewillett
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Post by Joaniewillett » Wed Jul 18, 2007 11:29 pm

Do tell - missed that bit of vital education!

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Allister
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Post by Allister » Wed Jul 18, 2007 11:45 pm

My family is from Roche (originally) and I spent my youth scurrying around Roche Rock. My mother told me and my brothers the story her mother told her and so on, back into the mists of time eternal.

An evil giant lived in the Roche area, ruling despotically over the local peasants. One day this unnamed giant was challenged to a boulder throwing contest, the victor would have rule and the loser must depart. The aim of the contest was to stack the rocks as neatly as possible.

The other giant was eventually victorious and forced the evil giant to leave.

Today we can see their legacy. Roche Rock (before the creation of the chapel) is stacked neatly, whereas Helmon Tor, where the evil giants rocks landed, is scattered every which way.

On a clear day you can see Helmon Tor from Roche Rock, and visa versa.


I am currently working into turning this story into a novel/screenplay. That story was my original premise, but has since escalated into an all out fantasy tale (hopefully to rival Lord of the Rings).


Srule
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Post by Srule » Thu Jul 19, 2007 5:42 pm

A similiar narrative to Allisters was told by my family between the great rivals; the carn brea giant and bolster who lived on st agnes beacon, the latter being rock free as bolster had lobbed all his ammo at carn brea, having two outcomes;one the rocky landscape of the carn and the other the killing of the carn brea giant.
You can still see parts of his body all over the carn, but the best is the giants head, when caught from the right angle(ie the little path down from east of the castle)you simply can not argue that giants didn't exist

Joaniewillett
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Post by Joaniewillett » Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:00 pm

Sounds cool! :-)

Actually, have vaguely heard similar, but it didn't register!


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TGG
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Post by TGG » Fri Jul 20, 2007 12:38 am



[size=small]"when Brutus and Corineus, his second in command, came to the island (Albion) he named the island Britain and his companions Britons Similarly, Corineus, who had precedence over all others, called his chosen share of the island Cornwall and his companions Cornish. The reference to what became Wales, Scotland and England, only occurred after Brutus died when he allocated these places to his sons, Kamber, Albanactus and Locrinus.

Whatever opinion, you may have on this presentation of history, it had a major influence on historical perception and which gave rise to the Galfridian Conceit. Even if a literary myth it reflects a particular understanding of Cornwall in the early 12th century, consistent with other contemporaneous knowledge. Therefore, as part of the etymology of Britain, it seems appropriate that the origins of Cornwall and Britain are very closely related."[/size]



A quoted extract from a discussion on 'Britain' within wikipedia. There were more giants there [in Corineus's share] than anywhere else and finally, Brutus left the last and the largest, Gogmagaog, for Corineus to defeat himself - at a place said to be Totnes.

For the full story read Geoffrey of Monmouth's, "History of the Kings of Britain"

TGG For The (Real)Reason Why!










edited by: TGG, Jul 20, 2007 - 11:36 AM
STOP THE CORNISH GENOCIDE! -
They declare their Cornishness with pride
Whilst oblivious to our genocide
That England imposes
With smiles and Red Roses
Where the innocents, so gullibly, reside.


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