Cornish National Sports Stadium?

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Porthia1947
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Post by Porthia1947 » Mon May 02, 2005 5:01 pm

The discussion in another topic area prompted me to widen the discussion around Cornish rugby (including its links with the ERFU) and the lack of opportunity for Cornish teams to play Irish, Welsh or Scottish teams.
While it's regretable that the Pirates have to move from their current home ground at the Mannaye, to play in the English (sic) premiership league the ground will have to meet a certain standard of capacity and safety. I would think probably it would be difficult to bring the current ground up to that standard. What we might see is Penzance taking the role of a Cornwall –wide team and perhaps another team in the Mounts Bay region filling the gap left by the Pirates. Myself I would like to see Cornwall dropping out of the English Rugby Union and playing in the Celtic League!!! Also wouldn’t it be great to see a bigger vision go into any new ‘Cornish Pirates’ ground i.e. this could be developed into a Cornish National Stadium with a large capacity so we could hold big games in Cornwall instead of for example thousands having to tramp up to Twickenham with the resulting loss of revenue to the Cornish economy.

Porthia1947
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Post by Porthia1947 » Mon May 02, 2005 6:52 pm

Yes I was actually thinking of them Stonefly, but glad you mentioned it anyway.

Tumbled
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Post by Tumbled » Mon May 02, 2005 7:32 pm

I've long thought that Cornwall should have a National Sports Stadium and it's a pity that Cornwall council couldn't have somehow raised funds (EU or lottery or whatever) to assist Dicky Evans with his venture for the new stadium in mid Cornwall. It would also be nice to see a Cornish rugby team one day in the Celtic League but there have been rumours lately that the 4 Welsh clubs are considering leaving the Celtic League and trying to join the Premiership, so I think Cornish Pirates are better off aiming for the Premiership ! A National Stadium is a must in the long run whatever happens.

Porthia1947
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Post by Porthia1947 » Wed May 04, 2005 5:02 pm


"HarvsPenzance" said:
porthia, who are the ERFU? Ethiopian? Estonian? Essex? Earth? I've googled it and I can see no rugby links anywhere
And furthermore, why the hell would Cornish clubs want to be involved in the celtic league? I don't see a 1800 mile weekly round trip to Ireland or Scotland being a viable option for the clubs, let alone us supporters

I think we have a different mindset HarvsPenzance. I would say what kind of a Cornish person would want to play in an English premiership or for England for that matter if there was a chance to play in a league with Wales, Scotland or Ireland.

Tumbled
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Post by Tumbled » Tue May 10, 2005 10:51 pm

This was on the Leinster and Munster website about the Future Of The Celtic League

IT was a fraught meeting in Dublin last Thursday between the various representatives of the Celtic League. In the four-year history of this competition, which has had the commercial clout of a barrow boy, there have always been rows. How many teams should compete? How long should the campaign be? Should it be a qualifier for Europe or just a means of filling in a gap in the season? Your answer depended on what best suited your country, not what was most appropriate for the competition itself.

Well, by the end of Thursday's get together it was easy to envisage a scenario where the usual rows could be put to one side, because literally there would be nothing left to play for.

It is ironic that, on the eve of Ireland treating the League as a meaningful competition and using it as the sole means for our provinces qualifying for the Heineken Cup, the League itself faces extinction. It won't happen next season, or even the season after that, but once the momentum for a breakaway gathers a bit of pace there could be no stopping it. The breakaway in question is more of a reunion really: the Anglo-Welsh alliance.

The meeting of Wasps and Llanelli in Stradey at the start of this season evoked memories of how it used to be. On that occasion it was the meeting of the Zurich Premiership champions and the Celtic League champions, but historically, English and Welsh clubs have been going at it aeons before the game went professional. And it was hugely popular.

Stuffing their season with Welsh fixtures was what facilitated Bath's emergence as a powerhouse of the English game. And the is kind. If you take the clubs of Wales and London and the South West alone, you have 10 or 12 outfits with pulling power and not too far to travel. Low mileage and big gates makes sense. So why hasn't something like this happened before now? Because Wales got so bad the only people who would touch them were their Celtic cousins. And even then it wasn't on their terms. Regularly it was the Irish who were calling the tune. The IRFU knew the game couldn't go on without their cooperation, so they dreamed up a song and the Welsh would have to join in.

Well, Wales have improved. Their rationalisation has been painful, but effectively they have their big four clubs - Cardiff, Llanelli, Swansea and Newport - dressed up as the regions. Meanwhile, across the bridge in England, the Powergen Cup is not what it sounds. Aside from the route it offers into the Heineken Cup, it has lost much of its appeal. It needs a revamp. And that's where the Welsh come in.

It may be bit late for next season, but for 2006/'07 they will almost certainly be a part of it, requiring a few weekends out of their season in the process. Those weekends will come at the expense of the Celtic League. The Welsh painted this picture last Thursday. It didn't go down well, not least because the Powergen Cup will be the thin end of the wedge. Next stop an Anglo Welsh League, which will require Wales reversing out of the Celtic relationship altogether and into a higher quality competition.

And where will that leave the rest of us? Eh, with a stunning fixture list that involves Glasgow and Edinburgh and the Borders, if they're still in business, and an interpro series that involves playing home and away. A lot of home and away.

Morgarrow
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Post by Morgarrow » Fri May 13, 2005 7:30 pm

I think Porthia is probably talking about the ERFU as opposed to the CRFU, WRU and SRU.

Porthia1947
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Post by Porthia1947 » Sat May 14, 2005 12:12 am


"HarvsPenzance" said:
[quote="morgarrow"]I think Porthia is probably talking about the ERFU as opposed to the CRFU, WRU and SRU.



For the love of GOD (if she/it/he) exists

WHO ARE THE ERFU?
There is the RFU, but NOT an ERFU.

I am Cornish and proud of it, but it really gets on my nerves when people refuse to accept reality, just because it interferes with their prejudices. It does no good to our cause for independence (or at least a decent level of autonomy)[/quote]

Thanks stonefly for saving me the trouble of being rude. Your reality and mine are different HarvsPenzance that's a reality of life. You, nor the education system, nor the government, nor ignorance will force me to change something I have believed since childhood (and I'm no spring chicken). Some people except what what they're told because they've been brought up not to challenge authority or popular belief. To put it simply for people that find it hard to think outside the box, if someone in 'authority' comes along and calls me John but my name is really Bill, do I challenge and correct him or think ah! he's an important man he must be right so I'll go along with him and although I'm Bill I'll let everyone call me John 'cause it makes life easier and I should appreciate my lot and not cause a fuss as there ain't much difference between Bill and John. Many people don't realise the how powerful English nationalism is because it's so subliminal in the way it pervades daily life. So HosksLudgvan it aint nothing to do with 'reality' but individual beliefs and rights.

The bit I put in the other forum about qualification for housing was meant to be tongue in cheek - just to show that there are communities around that have taken what would be seen elswhere as extreme measures to protect their way of life (the very reason why other people want to move there in the first place). If a small percentage of each of the cities in the UK decided they would like to move to Cornwall to live we would end up with 99% of greenfield land built on let alone brownfield land. That's the reality that both Cornish people and those thinking of moving here have got to consider. No-one want's to stop people enjoying Cornwall but what will there be left to enjoy if we don't start thinking about solutions now?

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