Diving dangers and Seasearch

Board for discussing anything sports related. Everything from rugby to surfing.
Morgarrow
Posts: 393
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:50 pm

Post by Morgarrow » Sun May 22, 2005 12:42 am

There was some sad news today about a diver missing following a dive on the James Egan Layne. Although sad for this persons family if it turns out to be a fatality, it's amazing that with hundreds of divers using Cornish waters each year, from the recently qualified to the very experienced, there aren't many more accidents or deaths. Probably a mixture of good training and sometimes a bit of luck to go with it.

While I'm on the subject of diving, for those divers who aren't total adrenaline junkies there's a project called Seasearch for volunteer sports divers who have an interest in what they're seeing under-water, want to learn more and want to help protect the marine environment. The main aim is to map out the various types of sea bed found around the Cornish coast as well as the species that live there. The Seasearch organisation then uses the information to identify the richest sites for marine life, the sites where there are problems and the sites which need protection. They run regular course in Cornwall to teach you what to look for and to train you how to record it. It's a great idea and if interested they can be contacted via the Cornwall Wildlife Trust, Five Acres, Allet, Truro, Cornwall, TR4 9DJ Tel: (01872) 273939 Fax: (01872) 225476 e-mail: info@cornwt.demon.co.uk

Morgarrow
Posts: 393
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:50 pm

Post by Morgarrow » Fri Jul 29, 2005 12:28 am

There's always a lot in the Cornish press, in particular during the summer months, about the thoughtless behaviour of some sea users. Recently there was concern about surfers, kayakers and inflatable dingy users moving in too close to seal colonies in the St Ives Bay/Godrevy area. Also I've noticed an increase in the number of high speed motor boats and large rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) being used for taking people on trips along the shoreline between Hayle and St Ives. This can be great fun and who wouldn't love it, but for those using the sea for more leisurely pursuits it can be a bit of a nightmare. A large multi-seater RIB ploughing through the waters can cause big problems for smaller craft in particular canoes, kayaks, people at anchor and fishing, snorkellers, and divers. Just of Porthminster Beach in St Ives is a small submerged reef quite popular with divers and I have seen both jet skis, large RIBs and speed boats crossing right over this reef several times a day. Isn't it a pity that people can't use common sense from the start? It would be great if those who get thrills from travelling fast would take sensible precautions a keep further out in the bay or at least wait to get to maximum speed until they are at a safer distance from the shore. Also if those that want to look at the marine life could get a pair of waterproof binoculars and do it from a distance it would not only beneficial to the animals, but prevent the need for yet more legislation. When I learned to dive in was told to look and not touch. In that way you leave the environment the way you found it for the next person to enjoy it. That's a good rule for all those who use the sea for leisure purposes I would have thought?

Morgarrow
Posts: 393
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:50 pm

Post by Morgarrow » Fri Aug 12, 2005 6:13 am

Recent news media coverage of sightings of potentially dangerous sharks in Cornish waters is music to the ears of newspaper editors and journalists looking for a good, bad or bizarre eye-catching headline. While lifeguards have to err on the side of caution that fact is that sharks have more to fear from humans than the other way around, with thousands being slaughtered each year for their fins alone. Here are some of the 'facts' from the International Shark Attack File [Florida Museum of Natural History]:

Seven fatalities occurred in 2004, a total similar to the four in 2003, three in 2002 and four in 2001, but lower than the 11 fatalities recorded in 2000. Two fatalities occurred in Australia and single deaths were reported from Brazil, California, Egypt, Hawaii, and South Africa. The number of serious attacks in 2000-2004, as measured by fatality rate (8.9%), has been lower than that of the decade of the 1990's (12.7%), continuing a century-long trend reflective of advances in beach safety practices and medical treatment, and increased public awareness of avoiding potentially dangerous situations.

As in recent years, the majority (44%: 27 attacks) of incidents occurred in North American waters. The 30 attacks in United States territorial waters (including Hawaii) were significantly fewer than totals recorded in 2003 (41), 2002 (47), 2001 (50), and 2000 (50). Elsewhere, attacks occurred in Australia (12), Brazil (5), South Africa (5), and Reunion Island (3), with single incidents reported from the Bahamas, Cuba, Egypt, Fiji, New Zealand, and Venezuela.

For more info go to: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Sharks/st ... ummary.htm

Porthia1947
Posts: 648
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2005 12:13 am

Post by Porthia1947 » Thu Sep 01, 2005 11:57 am



Also I've noticed an increase in the number of high speed motor boats and large rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) being used for taking people on trips along the shoreline between Hayle and St Ives. This can be great fun and who wouldn't love it, but for those using the sea for more leisurely pursuits it can be a bit of a nightmare.




Looks as if this was a bit of a nightmare to the 12 passengers last week too who got thrown into the water when the big yellow rigid inflatable's hull snapped when ploughing through the waves off Porthmeor beach. Eight of the passengers ended up at Treliske following a major rescue operation by the RNLI, a navy helicopter, beach lifeguards and police and ambulance crews.

Once upon a time (and not so long ago) all the sea trips around St Ives took place in boats skippered by St Ives men with fishing or other seafaring backgrounds. Now it's the day of the "thrill-ride craft" for tourists and I don't hear many local accents among those running them???

Masterclass
Posts: 1005
Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2004 8:18 am

Post by Masterclass » Fri Sep 02, 2005 4:49 pm

I almost fell off a ladder the other day. Which has nothing to do with diving or owt like that, I jsut thought the world should know.

Morgarrow
Posts: 393
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:50 pm

Post by Morgarrow » Sat Sep 03, 2005 10:20 pm

Well Masterclass thanks for that news on behalf of the world looking in on this forum. :-)

But the RNLI recently warned that leisure boat users should clean up their act - or face a possible raft of statutory controls aimed at guaranteeing seamanship standards. As the sea is one of the last unregulated areas of our lives, it would be a great shame if we lost that me thinks. Depends on how much of your leisure time you spend on, under or in the sea I suppose?

Masterclass
Posts: 1005
Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2004 8:18 am

Post by Masterclass » Mon Sep 05, 2005 12:52 pm

I think that there should be some training involved, but I can't really see it being easy to regulate. Probably because of the sheer size of the UK's coastline.

Morgarrow
Posts: 393
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:50 pm

Post by Morgarrow » Wed Sep 07, 2005 5:04 pm

Yes I agree chris - and why do they have to buzz around two yards off the beach when they got all the ocean to play in?

Morgarrow
Posts: 393
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:50 pm

Post by Morgarrow » Fri Jun 23, 2006 9:52 pm

MARINE CONSERVATION SOCIETY (MCS) CAMPAIGN

The Society needs your support to convince Government that marine conservation must be at the core of the Marine Bill. Have your say in how our seas are managed and protected. Please email the Government today in response to their consultation on the Marine Bill. For further information on the campaign and how to make your voice heard go to: www.mcsuk.org/campaigns/campaigns.php?t ... ine%20bill

The consolation closes today 23rd June so please don't delay (I have only just found the email from the MCS but the 23rd lasts until midnight so there may still be time). All you have to do to make a difference is go to the Marine Conservation Society website via the link above and follow the instructions. MCS has drafted a very good letter that you can adapt to reflect your own views sign and send to DEFRA . Please DO IT NOW - this is are only chance to influence what will be included in the Marine Bill -

Morgarrow
Posts: 393
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:50 pm

Post by Morgarrow » Fri Jun 23, 2006 11:29 pm

Excellent Mike ... that's at least two!! :-)

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest