Educational Resorces?

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P_Trembath
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Post by P_Trembath » Fri Apr 20, 2007 9:08 pm

Hi, due to cercumstances that I won't go into here, I am thinking of taking my 13 year old son out of school, and teaching him at home. 8-)
With that in mind, I was wondering if anyone out there could point me in the right direction for usefull resorces re Cornish history, Cornish culture etc.
I would be very greatfull. :-)
Everyone, Cornish or otherwise, has their own particular part to play. No part is too great or too small; no one is too old or too young to do something.

Joaniewillett
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Post by Joaniewillett » Fri Apr 20, 2007 9:28 pm

You could try http://www.sense-of-place.org.uk/contactus.html

Kind of envy you teaching your son at home. In an ideal world I'd like to home school my 4 year old, but not full time! Maybe two or three days a week...

Good luck anyway

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P_Trembath
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Post by P_Trembath » Fri Apr 20, 2007 10:13 pm

At the end of the day, it's his final decision. But I have to say that the only reason that I sent any of my children to school in the first place was for the social side of it, I do not have a lot of faith in the educational abilitys of schools in genral.
Most of my children have "Learning Difficulties", varying degrees of Dyslexia. My eldest son, who's now 22, only learnt to read in his last year at school, despite having one of the most generous Statements that the school had seen for someone who did not have either mental or physical difficulties.
I have spoken to many other parents in my position, who have all said that once having taken their children out of school and started teaching them at home, their children improved, in most cases, way beyond what was expected of them had they stayed in school. It's the one to one enviroment, coupled with being able to make the learning relavent to the child, and not having to pitch the teaching at some imagined middle ground.
That said, my son is a little concerned that I might turn everything he dose, from getting up in the morning to going to bed at night, into a lesson. Little dose he know. 8-)
Everyone, Cornish or otherwise, has their own particular part to play. No part is too great or too small; no one is too old or too young to do something.

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P_Trembath
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Post by P_Trembath » Fri Apr 20, 2007 11:18 pm

The problem is, that at 13 my son is still hardley able to read. When he was in primary school, before any of the class were able to read very much, he was far ahead of the rest of them with his "maths" type work. Unfortunatly, as the "maths" became more and more based on written questions, he fell behind in this as well. The same was true in science related subjects, and arts. Because he has difficulty with written words, the stuff he is good at suffers. His problem is, he learns in a different way to the accepted norm, and schools, despite what they tell you, arn't as a rule geared up for anything out of the norm.
I must admit, that personaly, I reckon that most kids don't know what they want to do even after they have left school. I believe that all kids should leave school at 14, go out to work for 3 or 4 years, then, after they've had taste of what life is like, go back to school/college, and take whatever subjects that they need to do in their chosen feild then. Not expect a 14 year old child to make desicions that will effect the rest of their lives, based on the cloistered experiances they have had in school. I also believe that education should be directed to preparing children for adult life ( work etc.), instead of as it is now, when each level of education only prepares you for the next. It dose seem to be getting better this way now, but it still has a long way to go.
Everyone, Cornish or otherwise, has their own particular part to play. No part is too great or too small; no one is too old or too young to do something.

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Ellery
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Post by Ellery » Sat Apr 21, 2007 12:34 am

I have Dyspraxia and Dyslexia.
There are some good books out there for parents, children and teachers. I recently got one called 'Caged in Chaos, A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free' which was written by a 16 year old dyspraxic girl! It's very helpful for all concerned and I just wish I had had it when I was at school. I was diagnosed(?) with dyspraxia at a young age but no one seemed to know exactly what it was or what it causes. But with this book I find so many similarities with my life! So much of it I didn't even know was down to my dyspraxia.

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TeamKernow
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Post by TeamKernow » Sun Apr 22, 2007 11:12 am

Education out of School - Cornwall

Education from Home - Cornwall

Tal-e-bot
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Post by Tal-e-bot » Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:36 pm

There is a folder that was given to all schools several years ago with Cornish songs, dances and history, by the council I think, for teaching in schools. Most of the ones I saw in schools were in cupboards covered in dust. There is also a good scheme called toe to toe. I think it is a book and I have heard it can produce some interesting results.

Joaniewillett
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Post by Joaniewillett » Sun Apr 22, 2007 10:47 pm

I agree with what you've said P-T. And its shocking that educational policy and funding now is geared almost exclusively for 4-19 year olds, with funding being slashed for mature students. I think that its only after you've figured the world out for yourself a little, and stretched your wings a bit that you can really decide what you want to do with the rest of your life. Its just such a shame that its much, much harder to do just that now, than it was even a couple of years ago.


Frenchie
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Post by Frenchie » Sun Apr 22, 2007 11:15 pm


I think that its only after you've figured the world out for yourself a little, and stretched your wings a bit that you can really decide what you want to do with the rest of your life.




Which would be fine if we lived in a society where the authorities want you to develop your natural skills and talents. But they don't. They want 'formated' 'systemised' kids ready for the New Labour agenda for the future.

There's only two real schools left in this country, one is the school of hard knocks (otherwise known as real life) the other is Steiner schools.

Everything else has a hidden agenda..

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