Kernewek in Cornish dialect

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Kattell
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Post by Kattell » Wed Mar 15, 2006 3:20 pm

I'm always intruiged and delighted by the amount of Kernewek that has remained in our everyday language e.g.

Caggle as in "You are caggled in mud" presumably from kagla to splatter with filth

Stank as in "I'm going out for a good stank around" presumably from stankya to trample or stamp with foot

Heller "She's a heller" from heller wildnatured individual

Can anyone think of any others?

Kattell
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Post by Kattell » Mon Mar 27, 2006 7:29 pm

Does anyone know if the word teasy comes from the kernewek tesek adj hot, sultry; hot-tempered, irritable ?

(BTW I didn't realise this was a dialect word until I went away to university!! :roll: :lol: )

Leathlaobhair
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Post by Leathlaobhair » Tue Apr 11, 2006 10:59 pm

I've heard a lot of mining vocabulary comes from Cornish; vug is one word I remember, and I think there are many more.

PengellyITA
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Post by PengellyITA » Wed Apr 12, 2006 9:33 am

My father would call guttering 'launders' which I believe is an Cornish word.

My gran is 96 and calls ants 'muryons'.

Other words that I know my family to speak are maized (meaning angry), heaval (meaning the long handled fork that farmers use), fitcher (meaning ferret), skat (as in strike or hit). Is tuss and old Cornish word?

FlammNew
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Post by FlammNew » Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:29 am

There's kernewek grammar in the dialect too: "I do go to Truro." is a direct translation of Kernewek grammar "My a wra mos dhe Druru."

Klidgy = toffee, sticky
Morgi = dogfish
Bal maiden

There's loads more!

GolowDydh
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Post by GolowDydh » Wed Apr 12, 2006 8:45 pm



Is tuss and old Cornish word?



It could be, was it used to refer to folk/people?

Porthia1947
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Post by Porthia1947 » Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:22 pm

[quote="FlammNew"] Klidgy = toffee, stickyquote]

Yes used to go over penzance to corpus christi fair and buy a bit a "clidgy nicey" (as my grandfather used to call it). General sweets were just called "nicey".

FlammNew
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Post by FlammNew » Thu Apr 13, 2006 9:21 am

So the West Saxons got their dialect from the Cornish then?

Kattell
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Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2005 1:36 pm

Post by Kattell » Mon Apr 17, 2006 7:42 pm


My father would call guttering 'launders' which I believe is an Cornish word.




That's a good one :D londeris Kernewek for gutter, I've just looked it up I hadn't realised it was derived from Kernewek, I knew about moryons but not that one :D

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Coady
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Location: Hayle

Post by Coady » Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:38 am

"Guss on, Thees a gate Ossmarine! Dussent e knaw what a launder is? Thees a gate vule! I knawd yer faither, an ee wudn no vule! Ee'd a bin ashamed of ee, gate buccaboo!

Now ush, I ave to maake evva caake an saffern buns fur tea treat dewn Preah Sans fur Satterday erels minister'l ave my guts fer garters!"

"Ais alright Gran, shall I riddle the range fur ee?"
We live in interesting times!

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