Pommy b@stards needed...

Discussion about what\'s going on outside of Cornwall
Xxxxxx
Posts: 1605
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 2:13 am

Post by Xxxxxx » Thu Aug 18, 2005 10:36 pm


Last Updated: Wednesday, 17 August 2005, 23:19 GMT 00:19 UK
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4160570.stm

Would you be better off in Oz?

The Australian government is launching a massive drive to attract 20,000 skilled migrants from countries such as Britain to swell its workforce. It hopes the promise of better weather and quality of life will lure thousands of applicants from its target professions to cross the world in search of a new life.

But how does quality of life Down Under shape up compared with life in Britain for people working in some of Australia's target professions?

EARNINGS

Wages in many of the trades and professions hit by labour shortages in Australia are higher there than they are in the UK:

Bricklayers earn an average of £21,113 a year in the UK compared with £29,551, according to the US-based international wage comparison website Salaryexpert.com.

Motor mechanics earn about £25,869 in the UK compared with their Australian counterparts on £30,128.

Carpenters in Australia earn an average £24,980 - nearly £5,000 more than they would in the UK.

Accountants take home an average £38,956 compared with £34,138 in the UK.

Chefs could be better off in Australia too, earning about £3,500 more than the average UK wage for their profession of £27,536.

Nurses choosing to emigrate could enjoy an extra £8,000 a year. The average registered nurse in Australia takes home £37,110, compared with £29,070 in the UK.

Hairdressers are among the few professionals who would have to take a pay cut, with average earnings in Australia at £17,495, compared with the UK's £19,225.

COST OF LIVING

Australians pay less for daily essentials such as food, with a typical loaf of bread costing 38p compared with 65p in the UK, and a pint of milk 30p compared with 45p.

It is cheaper to eat and drink out in Australia, with a McDonald's Big Mac burger some 55p dearer at £1.99 in the UK and a pint of beer 25p more expensive at an average of £2.50.

A typical cinema ticket in Australia costs about £4, while in the UK it is £6.50.

Petrol prices are on the rise in Australia as in the rest of the world, but fuel remains far cheaper than in the UK - about 54p per litre in cities compared with the UK average of 91p per litre.

HOUSE PRICES

In Sydney, Australia's most expensive city, the average house price is about £196,000, compared with London's average, which has soared above £300,000.

In Brisbane, considered more representative of Australian prices, homes cost an average of £113,000 compared with the British average of £196,000.

In Sydney, a three-bedroom house which would cost more than £1,000 per week to rent in central London can be rented for £105 a week.

A similar property in Brisbane would cost about £95 per week.

WEATHER

Much of Australia is warm or hot throughout the year, and even along the cooler southern coasts the winters are mild rather than cold.

Only Tasmania has a temperate climate comparable with that of Britain.

Sydney's hottest months are December, January and February, with temperatures reaching an average of 26C, while in winter they drop to about 8C in July.

Darwin in the Northern Territory has a minimum average of 19C in winter and up to 34C in summer, although it is also very wet during the summer months.

Britain's climate is notoriously variable and changeable from day to day. Weather is generally cool to mild with frequent cloud and rain, but occasional settled spells of weather occur in all seasons.

While the south is usually a little warmer than the north, and the west wetter than the east, the continual changes of British weather mean that occasionally these differences may be reversed.

London has an average maximum temperature of 22C in July, falling to a minimum average of 2C in winter, with similar temperatures in Birmingham.


http://www.immi.gov.au/migrate/index.htm




A Photograph of a typical winters day, taken here by me last week. :D :D :D

CornishIntifada
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:56 am

Post by CornishIntifada » Fri Aug 19, 2005 1:04 am

yeah the BBC hahaha

Here is some real truth....

"Anyone who buys a block of land, particularly in western Sydney, has to cough up $100,000 in State Government taxes before they have even bought a brick to build a home.

"People such as nurses and teachers simply aren't able to afford to live and work in Sydney any longer."

Real Estate Institute of NSW president Rowen Kelly said he was surprised by Mr Macfarlane's advice for young people to look outside Sydney for places to live.

"It doesn't quite gel that he's advising people to stay away, yet he also would like to see the NSW economy move ahead," he said.

Offering a message to young home buyers, he said: "There are more affordable properties in the outskirts of Sydney. In some local government areas you can still get properties in the $300,000s."

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/don ... 39198.html

Xxxxxx
Posts: 1605
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 2:13 am

Post by Xxxxxx » Fri Aug 19, 2005 1:26 am

I think you should know; there's more to Oz than just Sydney....

Just a thought...

CornishIntifada
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:56 am

Post by CornishIntifada » Sun Aug 21, 2005 4:57 pm

Yeah Stroppygit but how many people migrate to Adelaide or Kalgoorlie

Xxxxxx
Posts: 1605
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 2:13 am

Post by Xxxxxx » Sun Aug 21, 2005 11:19 pm


Geographic distribution

Immigrants are more highly urbanised than the Australian-born population. In 1999, of Australians aged 15 years and over, 80% of those born overseas and 57% of those born in Australia were living in one of the eight capital cities.

In 1999, 83% of people who migrated to Australia as an adult between 1997 and 1999 were living in one of the capital cities. These recent immigrants were more likely to have been living in a capital city than those who arrived before 1981 (76%), although they were slightly less likely than people who migrated to Australia earlier in the 1990s (86%), and in the 1980s (84%).

In 1999, most immigrants aged 15 years and over lived in either New South Wales (37%) or Victoria (26%) - higher proportions than the Australian born at 33% and 25% respectively. However, recent immigrants were more concentrated than longer established immigrants in New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia.


http://www.abs.gov.au/Ausstats/abs@.nsf ... enDocument



The information on this page briefly describes the options available to encourage skilled migrants or temporary entrants to live and work in areas outside of Australia's major cities.

To assist regional Australia to gain increased benefits from skilled and business migration the Australian Government has established a network of Regional Outreach Officers as part of a 2004-05 Budget initiative. For information about the Regional Outreach Officer network
See: Regional Outreach Officers

Please note that Australian state and territory governments are keen to encourage more skilled migrants to settle in many regions of Australia and in some cases may even offer some forms of assistance. Information about their involvement can be found on their websites.
See: Regional Opportunities - State and Territory Governments

http://www.immi.gov.au/migration/regional/index.htm





Come out to Oz young people! Don't settle for a Cornish subsidised house, and job in the finacial sector. Come to Oz and live the good life!!

CornishIntifada
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:56 am

Post by CornishIntifada » Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:05 am

Yes stroppy git is generally right though - the life is better there than in the UK if only for the climate. But it depends on what stage of life you are at. I would find young people leaving regional centres for the glitz of Sydney, but really Sydney is a long way from the rest of the world. There are depressed areas of Australia. I wouldn't say living in Adelaide or country NSW is living the high life.
lastly he should remember that Cornish miners created a lot of the wealth that benefited Australia and London. People wishing to escape church of england tithes, starvation and enclosure acts. Risked a harsh environment and disease to go to South Australia, western Australia and live in bark huts and dug outs from the ground.

CornishIntifada
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:56 am

Post by CornishIntifada » Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:15 am

Its not just asian immigrants -there are immigrants from all over the world but the problem the native born Australians are having with house prices are as aresult of the emigration of pound and HKD holders.....

Xxxxxx
Posts: 1605
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 2:13 am

Post by Xxxxxx » Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:12 am



The Cornish and their decendents are not classified as pomms, BTW.



Everyone from the UK is a pom according to the buggers here. They even have the cheeck to call me a pommy, and I've got such a striong Welsh accent that even in Wales people ask "who was that Welsh bloke?"

CornishIntifada
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:56 am

Post by CornishIntifada » Tue Aug 23, 2005 1:24 am

Who are the people calling you a pom?? Other immigrants whose residence stretch back only 3 generations and who don't know the real meaning of the word? I remember a wog calling a paddy a pom in Australia. It didn't make much sense to the Aussies there. Scots Welsh etc are not Poms. Only dumbass migrants think that as they haven't bothered to mix with any real Australians.

Xxxxxx
Posts: 1605
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 2:13 am

Post by Xxxxxx » Tue Aug 23, 2005 1:33 am

Everyone from the UK is lumped under the term "pommy" these days.I'm Welsh, and as I've already stated, get called a Pom frequently. You're just upset because your Australian mate with a Cornish surname isn't enough of a pom to get into the UK.

CornishIntifada
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:56 am

Post by CornishIntifada » Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:02 am

you'd get called a pom strop because you probably act like one.

I can't see a Scot getting called a pom except by johhny come lately greeks etc mentioned above. The Australians know the difference between Cornish Welsh and pom.

Xxxxxx
Posts: 1605
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 2:13 am

Post by Xxxxxx » Tue Aug 23, 2005 4:33 am

You know, it is hysterically funny, being sat in an office full of Ozzies, and being with Ozzies every day, treating ill Ozzies, and going out drinking with Ozzies, and paragliding with Ozzies, and rock climbing with Ozzies, living in Oz, being married to an Ozzie even, and yet this nincompoop still thinks he can lecture me on what Ozzies thinnk and do.


Hint; We only have your word that you have ever been to Oz, and as your seen here as a freaking loony, that is worth......

CornishIntifada
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:56 am

Post by CornishIntifada » Tue Aug 23, 2005 4:40 am

Why not? I know Australia better than you. You live on the east coast thats as Australian as raw fish and a side order of fries.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests