Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

A new forum dedicated to Kernewek - the Cornish language, Cornish culture and the history of the Duchy of Cornwall
CJenkin
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by CJenkin » Fri Jun 18, 2010 3:31 pm

Sean of the Dead wrote:Ok, how does one say "you're welcome" (what one responds with when someone else says "thank you") in Cornish??? I can't find anything anywhere, and I'm sure I'll go crazy if I can't find out. :shock: Meur ras! :D
Again this really seems to me an english idiom, thanks would seem to me an appropriate response but I confess I have heard some cornish speaker's say 'Wolkom(m) os ta!' - personally it's not to my taste as it seems a bit too contrived.

Morvil
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Morvil » Fri Jun 18, 2010 8:24 pm

Che 'alja leverel y'wedh: "Byth na lavar a'n dra!"

Sean of the Dead
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Sean of the Dead » Sat Jun 19, 2010 6:12 am

CJenkin wrote:
Sean of the Dead wrote:Ok, how does one say "you're welcome" (what one responds with when someone else says "thank you") in Cornish??? I can't find anything anywhere, and I'm sure I'll go crazy if I can't find out. :shock: Meur ras! :D
Again this really seems to me an English idiom, thanks would seem to me an appropriate response but I confess I have heard some cornish speaker's say 'Wolkom(m) os ta!' - personally it's not to my taste as it seems a bit too contrived.
Of course it's an English idiom' which is why I specified in the parentheses the meaning of it, indicating I know it wouldn't be the same in Cornish.
Mar pleg, gwrewgh ewna ow hammwriansow Kernewek.

Karesk
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Karesk » Sat Jun 19, 2010 10:57 am

Should "pubonan" be treated as singular or plural, in the sentence below?

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factotum
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by factotum » Sat Jun 19, 2010 11:43 am

I'm not even sure of the rule in English, though no doubt some pedant of a schoolmaster will have invented one. Which is right :

Everyone found his seat in the bus

or

Everyone found their seats in the bus

Morvil
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Morvil » Sun Jun 20, 2010 12:44 pm

Old style grammar would prescribe "Everyone found his seat." Or "everyone found his or her seat."
"Their" has very much become a gender neutral singular possessive pronoun in addition to its plural usage, so I would argue that the following is just as correct: "Everyone has found their seat."
What is wrong, though, is the belief that such usage is a new development introduced by the feminist movement. I haven't got the references with me right now, but there are instances of the use of "their" as a gender neutral singular since Shakespeare's times.

Sean of the Dead
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Sean of the Dead » Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:39 am

Now that it's finally summer, I have the time to study languages again. :) Unfortunately, it has been a while since I have studied or used Cornish, so I have been forgetting some of it, but I am going to review parts of the KDL course, doing exercises and comprehending the dialogues, and I have begun to read Alys y'n Vro a Varthusyon. Hopefully I won't have too much trouble reading it, but I've come across a couple words I can't find the meaning of, "ha pandr'a dal lyver" and "gwella galla". Does anyone know what the bolded words mean?
Mar pleg, gwrewgh ewna ow hammwriansow Kernewek.

pietercharles
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by pietercharles » Sun Jul 18, 2010 9:56 am

'dal' is the 3rd person singular present of the verb 'tyli', 'to pay', mutated after 'a'. What it means in your phrase depends on the context, and there's not really enough to tell. The verb is very often used to mean 'should', 'ought to' - 'my a dal mos dhe Druru' or 'y tal dhymm mos dhe Druru' - 'I ought to go to Truro'.
'galla' is the 3rd person singular imperfect subjunctive of 'galloes'. The phrase means 'as best he/she could'. There are a number of common idioms like this ('skaffa gylliv' - 'as fast as I can'), that use the comparative form of the adjective followed by the subjunctive of 'galloes'.

pietercharles
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by pietercharles » Sun Jul 18, 2010 10:02 am

I looked in my copy of 'Alys'.
'Ha pandr'a dal lyver heb delinyansow na keskowsow?' means 'And what use is a book without drawings or conversations?'
'tyli' here is used in the sense of 'what does it pay someone to have such a book'.

carrek
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by carrek » Sun Jul 18, 2010 1:59 pm

pietercharles wrote:I looked in my copy of 'Alys'.
'Ha pandr'a dal lyver heb delinyansow na keskowsow?' means 'And what use is a book without drawings or conversations?'
'tyli' here is used in the sense of 'what does it pay someone to have such a book'.
Doesn't "tyli" also mean "to be worth"? So could it mean "what is a book worth"?

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factotum
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by factotum » Sun Jul 18, 2010 5:14 pm

What were originally two separate words, meaning 'to pay' and 'to owe' seem to have got rather muddled up. Anyway y tal dhymm means 'I ought (to)', whether literally it's 'It would pay me to' or 'I owe it to someone to, it's my duty to' is probably academic.

Sean of the Dead
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Sean of the Dead » Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:31 pm

Meur ras! I need to get more used to figuring out the root word of conjugations, it's not as easy as it looks. :oops:
Mar pleg, gwrewgh ewna ow hammwriansow Kernewek.

Sean of the Dead
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Sean of the Dead » Wed Oct 13, 2010 9:59 pm

I've recently been getting back into Cornish (I'm horrible at keeping promises :oops: ), and I still really love it, and still want to be fluent in it. So, I have questions about grammar again:

How would you use the negative in a subordinate clause? For example, how would you translate: "I know that he is not coming here today."? I'm not so sure anymore, I need to review lots of grammar.
Mar pleg, gwrewgh ewna ow hammwriansow Kernewek.

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factotum
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by factotum » Thu Oct 14, 2010 12:19 am

My a woer na dheuth ev omma hedhyw

Morvil
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Re: Sjheiss a dhysk Kernewek

Post by Morvil » Thu Oct 14, 2010 11:15 am

I think I would use the present-future of dos here rather than the preterite:

My a wor na dheu ev (bys) omma hedhyw.

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